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View of the course at Wilmette Golf Club

The entire golf course is set up to be a test in decision-making ability. There's just enough water and bunkering to force some honest approach shots which means intelligent club selection from the tee is a must.

Stray just a bit from the fairway and Wilmette can stymie you. The very mature, stately oak and elm trees encroach very close to the narrow fairways.

If you give yourself the chance and reach in regulation, birdies can be had! These are some of the most receptive, truest and fastest greens in the area and could be one of the most distinguishing aspects of golf at Wilmette. Once you get your ball rolling on line here, it stays on line making putting Wilmette greens an absolute joy!

Wilmette does offer five different sets of tees to test all abilities. The black tees are the longest and measure 6,363 yards and carry a 70.8 rating with a slope of 128. The white tees the shortest set and measure only 4,668 yards with a rating of 67.5 and a slope of 118 for ladies. It's easy to see that Wilmette Golf Club adjusts to fit all players.

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Guidelines & Policies

Keep Pace Guidelines
The Wilmette Golf Club makes a sincere effort to ensure that all golfers enjoy their day of golf by maintaining an acceptable pace of play.

  • All groups must report to the Starter at least 15 minutes before their tee time. Groups failing to do so will loose their tee time and revert to standby status.
  • A group is expected to complete 18 holes in four hours, 20 minutes or less.
  • A group is expected to complete 9 holes in two hours,10 minutes or less.
  • Foursomes started on the course at nine minute intervals will finish playing in less than four hours, 20 minutes. All golfers must keep pace with the Keep Pace Clocks on the course. If a foursome keeps up with the group in front of them, they will never have a problem. Wilmette Golf Club rangers are trained to help groups keep play moving and will assist any group that may need extra help.
  • If a group falls behind the Keep Pace Clock, the group will be approached by a ranger and asked to closed the gap. If your group fails to do so in three holes, you will be asked to then pick up and move to the proper position on the course. Then if the gap is not closed, the players will be asked to leave the course by the manager on duty and will be given a prorated refund. Unlimited Members will not be given a prorated refund.
  • A beginner golfer may be asked to leave the course when he/she cannot reasonably hit the ball or keep up with the normal pace of a public golf course. A full refund will be issued.

Cancellation Policy
Groups that reserve a Tee Time during Open Play must notify the Wilmette Golf Club 24 hours in advance if they will be unable to play at their reserved time. This can be done by using our online tee-time reservation system. Failure to cancel in a timely fashion will result in a per player charge to the account of the member who booked the Tee Time unless the time can be resold.

Rain Check Policy
If a golfer is directed to cease play by Wilmette Golf Club professional staff due to inclement weather, a rain check will be issued for an identical round upon presentation of the day's receipt. Rain checks include golf car if purchased. Rain checks will be good for any time other than reserved lottery times. Rain checks expire one year after the issued date.

Lightning & Rain Delay
If the golf course experiences a lightning or rain delay, all tee times scheduled prior to the opening of the course will revert to standby status. The golf course professional staff will make every effort to work groups affected by the weather delay onto the course.

Frost Delay Policy
In cold weather, morning tee times may be delayed because of frost. Golfers are advised to arrive for their originally scheduled tee time to confirm their starting time. For frost delays we will push back all tee times. Play will begin in order once the frost is gone. For example, a 9 a.m. tee time with a 30 minute frost delay will have a new tee time of 9:30 a.m.

Junior Play & Practice Regulations

  • Jr. Silver can play Monday-Friday anytime and after 12:00 on Saturday & Sunday.
  • A Junior is defined as anyone between the ages of 8-17 as of March 31, 2017.
  • Juniors under the age of eight must be accompanied by an adult to play or use the practice facility.
  • Junior Members must have written permission to charge expenses to their house accounts.
  • Junior Members cannot be a member of a Reserved Time Lottery foursome or play in the lottery times without being charged a Regular Member fee.
  • Junior golfers are expected to show proper etiquette and to obey the rules and policies of the Wilmette Golf Club.
  • The Wilmette Golf Club reserves the right to suspend playing privileges of any junior who does not obey the rules and policies of the Wilmette Golf Club.

Course Etiquette
On Course Etiquette: It is Everyone's Responsibility
Presented by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America

Key Points:

  • Golf course etiquette is an all-encompassing term that refers to demeanor, adherence to course maintenance rules, and dress, among other issues.
  • The basis for ball mark repair and divot replacement is for competitive and agronomic reasons.
  • By leaving turf damaged (unrepaired), it becomes susceptible to disease and/or infestation of weeds, resulting in a lower quality of playing surface.
  • As a general rule, replace any divot on the course unless there is a sand or sand/seed mixture provided in a container on the golf car.
  • When replacing a divot, the policy is to replace the divot so the grass can send down new roots.
  • Replace the turf in the same direction it came out, and tap down firmly so the mower won't pull it back out.

A famous college basketball coach once said that recruiting was like shaving -- miss just one day and you look bad. It could be said that golf course management personnel, especially superintendents, feel the same way about golfer etiquette on the course.

Golf course etiquette is an all-encompassing term that refers to demeanor, adherence to course maintenance rules, and dress, among other issues. However, most associate golf course etiquette to the concept of ball mark repair and divot replacement. Take a moment and consider what a course would look like if patrons were excused from replacing divots or fixing ball marks for just one day. A well-managed facility would look like a battlefield.

Golf course personnel are unanimous in stating that, as a whole, golfers still do not do an adequate job in repairing their ball marks and divots. Despite the presence of posters, notes in newsletters and announcements in meetings to serve as reminders, most facility managers believe the message can never be repeated too much.

This becomes an even bigger issue as the game expands to include more juniors and those who have recently picked up the sport. Instructors and experienced golfers should be diligent in teaching the how and why of golf course etiquette. Failing to teach golfers the proper techniques now creates future problems.

The basis for ball mark repair and divot replacement is for competitive and agronomic reasons. Balls that land in unrepaired divots place a golfer at a disadvantage, just as having to putt over a ball mark. By leaving turf damaged (unrepaired), it becomes susceptible to disease and/or infestation of weeds, resulting in a lower quality of playing surface. This necessitates the need for attention by golf course superintendents and their staffs, thereby taking them away from more pressing duties. As a general rule, a ball mark repaired within 10 minutes will heal with a smooth surface within two to three days. An unrepaired ball mark may take as long as three weeks to heal, but the result will be an uneven surface.

Because grass varieties differ from course to course, and from fairways to the rough, the best rule to follow in replacing divots is to check with the golf course superintendent for the particular policy. As a general rule, replace any divot on the course unless there is a sand or sand/seed mixture provided in a container on the golf car. Typically, the divot is replaced on any course with bentgrass or bluegrass fairways. If you are playing on a course with bentgrass fairways and bluegrass rough, you must pay particular attention to the materials in the container.

If just sand is provided, then fill the divot hole and tamp down the sand with your foot. If a sand/bentgrass seed mixture is provided, divots in the rough would not be replaced so as to not contaminate the bluegrass with bentgrass seed. In bermuda grass fairways, generally sand is just used.

In replacing a divot, the policy is to replace the divot so the grass can send down new roots. If so, replace the turf in the same direction it came out, and tap down firmly so the mower won't pull it back out. If you are walking and no sand is provided, smooth the divot hole with your feet, gently pulling the sides of the divot hole to the center.

For more information regarding golf course maintenance and etiquette, contact your local superintendent or the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America at Call the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America at (800) 472-7878 or www.gcsaa.org.